Proactive versus reactive

Somebody recently asked me if Agile approaches aren’t essentially reactive, with Waterfall being proactive. It’s a good question, and I’m sure there are a lot of interesting answers. Here’s my take.

Proactively reactive

In terms of product produced, you can be more proactive in an Agile context than you can in a Waterfall context. With Waterfall methods, you just have to hope your designs and plans are correct, reacting massively after each large release. With Agile approaches you can continually test your assumptions and hypotheses, allowing you to eliminate bad ideas early and invest more resources in areas that have been proven to deliver more long-term value.

Some Agile shops may end up stuck in purely reactive cycles, with no long-term plans. (I don’t see that much.) But the good ones are continuously updating their plans based on the new information that you can only gain if you can release frequently. It has been said that Waterfall is plan-driven, while Agile methods are planning-driven. Having tried both, I think frequent plan improvement is much more proactive.

The Agile conversation

Another way to look at it is that Agile approaches proactively take advantage of people’s reactive skills by creating situations where their reactions will be maximally useful.

Conversations are in some sense essentially reactive: you say something, I respond to it, you respond in turn. But we can proactively decide to have a conversation and expect to get something useful, perhaps novel out of it.

Agile approaches have conversations with markets and user communities, using new releases to advance the discussion. We release something and say, “How about this?” People respond: they love X, they hate Y, and how did you miss Z! We release another thing and say, “Is this better for you?” And so the conversation goes, week after week.

Clicky Web Analytics